pexels-photo-961424.jpegNobody wants to be just another face in the crowd. We all wish to be acknowledged, considered and seen as a unique individual among the other faces. So, how do parents ensure that their child isn’t regarded as just another face in the crowded classroom?

When we are treated as a number, not a person, it is far easier to get lost amidst the others around us. It becomes far easier for teachers, in school settings, to give a low grade because your child is just another face, practically anonymous. You know that your child deserves a B, but withot being noticed, teachers will tend to grade more strict. There’s no ‘A’ for effort.

You don’t expect that your child should be given credit for work undeserving or undone. You want the uniqueness of your child, as a learner to be considered for what is known, how concepts are processed, what he or she can do, and do well. That’s a great way to strategize teaching and assess learning in the classroom.

This where you come in, as a parent, your child’s advocate and biggest supporter. When your face and your voice are known to your child’s educator, you are ensuring that your child will receive the encouragement, recognition and consideration from his or her teachers.

boy child childhood happiness
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Call the school and ask for your child’s teacher. If in class, not to worry, the staff will forward the message. Better than that, if you aren’t usually the person who greets your child at dismissal, find the time in your schedule to do so. At these times, approach your child’s teacher and ask one central and simple question,”How is my child doing in class?” That’s just enough to open up the communication between you. It also demonstrates your concern.

Ask about areas that your child may need help, and ask for tips you may use at home. Ask the teacher about the strategies employed, and whether they’ve been successful. Tell the teacher something unique about your child, and surely that will be remembered. If you have a hectic schedule, tell the teacher. This also helps them to better understand an absence from events, and it will not presumed a lack of concern.

Do these things BEFORE there is a problem at school. It could also serve to thwart future problems. It is far better that you politely introduce yourself in the absence of any performance problems. This can motivate teachers to consider different strategies and interventions in that setting before they consider calling you, the Principal or School Counselor. At that point, news isn’t good and your child likely be treated as a number, a face in the crowd.

You do not want your child to be viewed as a ‘bad seed‘, just waiting to be recognized for poor behavior, underperformance, and willfully disruptive or defiant. Make sure teachers can contact you, before issues escalate. Try to intervene. They do the best they know how and need your help.

photo of boy wearing denim jacket

It is much harder to harshly discipline or ignore[figuratively] a child with an engaged parent. That is your power and influence in that setting. You make the difference between suspension and detention, accelerated programs versus special education, and being viewed as a growing child with a developing mind or a potential juvenile delinquent.

Parents help make the difference between their child being perceived deficient or exceptional. Misunderstood behaviors in the classroom can be deemed a determinant of special education symptomology or a demonstration of exceptional intellectual capacity. Help your school choose exceptional! Engage with the teachers at school-in your child’s best interest!

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Published by JaDonnia B.

An education and counseling professional, I focus my expertise on diversity, inclusion and family engagement/empowerment Of particular importance is the partnership between parents and the community schools that serve their children. Highlighting strategies, tips and evidence-based best practices for family engagement, my aim is to alter mindsets, broaden perspectives, foster empathy, and build capacity. Offering 'food for thought' and inviting discussion, I also tell truths rarely explored. A holistic culturally-responsive approach to teaching, learning and engaging others begins with respect. I promote respect and fully integrating curricular diversity in formal learning settings! Collaboration with families is necessary, because parents hold the master key that unlocks doors to child health and wellness, academic achievement, and believe it or not, teacher excellence and stronger school communities.

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