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10(+3) Things Parents Wish Teachers Would Do

What do parents want from their child’s teacher at school? What relationship dynamics are desired? How do parents want teachers to engage their child and engage with them?

Below are ten plus three additional examples of what parents want from teachers:

woman wearing black framed eyeglasses and teal button up shirt and beige blazer sitting at table near white macbook

1. Build students’ self-esteem by using praise generously and avoiding ridicule and negative public criticism, embarrassing already emotionally fragile students, particularly in the presence of their peers.

2. Get to know each child‘s needs, interests and special talents, as well as the way each child learns best. Let that inform your instructional strategies. Learn what parents know about their child that will help to result in desired outcomes.

3. Communicate often and openly with parents, contacting them early about academic or behavioral problems, being candid rather than defensive when discussing these problems. communicate with them to spread good news, and reinforce your instruction. Be genuine, appreciative and acknowledge their strengths, without being patronizing. Keep an open door policy for parents to be able to contact you when necessary. Parents want to be kept in the loop.

woman and girl using tablet computer

4. Regularly assign homework that helps children learn, and advise parents how they can work with their children on their homework.

5. Set high academic standards, expecting all students to learn and helping them to do so.

6. Care about children, since children learn best when taught by warm, friendly, caring and enthusiastic teachers.

7. Treat all children fairly and do not play favorites.

8. Enforce a positive discipline code based on clear and fair rules that are established, fully explained and sufficiently practiced throughout the school year — reinforce positive behavior; re-frame, re-purpose and redirect negative behavior. Do not seek to punish. Rather, create teachable moments.

boy looking on a tidied desk

9. Be aware of students’ different learning styles and vary teaching methods to help each child achieve success.

10. Encourage parent participation by reaching out to involve parents in their children’s education. Show parents how they can help their children at home. Understand that parents
want to work with teachers to help their children be successful.

BONUS

woman wearing white and pink hijab

11. Provide cultural affirmation and recognition. Place mirrors before them-give them positive images of themselves[through others who look like them] in instruction and illustration. Enlighten and teach students about their unique cultural footprints and histories through stories never told, neither in nor outside of school. Respect equals appreciation. Teach with respect for diversity.

12. Make classroom learning experiences rewarding and engaging to students, while challenging success and growth. Develop lessons creatively in order that children look forward to entering the classroom everyday-for the learning opportunities more than gym and lunch. Fill students with such excitement that, at the end of each day, they go home eager to discuss their learning activities with parents.

13. ( Lucky 13) Love your job. Love your job. Love your job. Students and parents love and respect you more when they can see that you love your job and can clearly see that,  to you, the perks are the children you engage everyday. Parents are your partners, and as such, you help complete the learning circle for the leaders of tomorrow. Everyone wants the best outcomes.

Now, is that too much for parents to ask from teachers?

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