How Promoting Resilience is Harmful to African-American Families

Resilience theory suggests that we are to encourage  successful adaptations to negative life events, trauma, stress, and other forms of risk. In other words, in the face of adversity, we promote people to perform at optimal or ‘normal’ adaptive levels and work through these situations, events and circumstances. Many African-American families in the United States deal […]

GRIEF, LOSS and SEXUAL ASSAULT: The Agony of An Untold Story

There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you. —Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on the Road, 1969 Sexual assault survivors are among the most disenfranchised populations, coping with narratives of multiple losses, uncertainty, and grief that frequently go unacknowledged. An alleged perpetrator gleefully walks across the stage at a college graduation, […]

My Vision for Public Education

  With so much divisiveness in this country, and the lack of respect for our cultural pluralism: I envision a day when public education becomes the true equalizer that it is supposed to be for all who enroll their children into a system designed to prepare them for life, college and career success. Educators will […]

Do’s & Don’ts: How Restorative Practices Can Transform Schools

  In the “President’s Blog,” IIRP President John W. Bailie, Ph.D., shares his thoughts on a variety of topics relevant to leadership, social innovation and education. In this piece, Dr. Bailie offers some advice for teachers and administrators implementing restorative practices in schools. A friend of mine took a challenging, and some would say ill-advised, […]